The Michael Tippett School

The Michael
Tippett School

Unlocking Potential
Everyone’s Future Counts

Pupil Premium

The Pupil Premium is government funding for students who come from disadvantaged backgrounds. It is to be spent on provision for students who qualify for Free School Meals and/or Universal credit to raise their attainment and close any gaps between their performance and that of their peers.

 2015/16 Pupil Premium Expenditure and Impact

TMTS received £33,660 for 34 students in KS3 AND 4 who qualified for Pupil Premium. All of this money was spent. 

How this money was allocated: 

TMTS used our Pupil Premium funding to contribute to the cost of  therapeutic and life enriching experiences for students . The aim of this was to provide students with a range of  experiences and therapies to complement our expanding curriculum. These therapeutic experiences consisted consist of Art therapies , Yoga , Music therapies, Rebound therapies, Oasis, Ebony Stables,  swimming at Brixton Leisure Centre and our work within the Brockwell Park Community Greenhouses. This works support our commitment to holistic experiences for all .  Due to this funding the school is able to offer universal access to the provisions mentioned above. 

The Impact of Pupil Premium: 

The range of experiences offered through Pupil Premium funding has supported pupils emotional, social, physical and sensory needs. The experiences offered have supported and complemented targeted work offered by a range of Multidisciplinary services including: Lambeth Educational Psychology Service, Occupational Therapy Service, Speech and Language Therapy Service,Physiotherapy Services and other health agencies.  

As in previous years the impact resulting from the use of the pupil premium at TMTS was high. Whether students received an individual intervention or a combination, they were able to benefit by making good progress. This definition included academic progress but also other measures such as increased enjoyment of learning, increased understanding of their environment and improved social skills or self-regulation of behaviour.

Overall analysis of the progress made by students eligible for Pupil Premium funding showed they performed well as a group. Differences in progress and attainment at TMTS are most strongly explained by differences in types of SEN rather than socio-economic group membership. Pupil Premium funding enabled TMTS to implement interventions that helped a number of students to stay on track and meet their targets regardless of the disadvantages they may have faced resulting from their lower income background. The interventions fall outside the remit of our traditional funding and for this reason, the Pupil Premium has had a high impact. We will review how we measure impact yearly.  

 

2014-15 Pupil Premium Expenditure and Impact:

TMTS received £31,790 for 34 students in KS3 and 4 who were eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) in 2014-15. All of this money was spent.

How the money was allocated:

Building on the work from 2013-14, £12,000 was allocated to continue yoga-based interventions for eligible students who would otherwise have been at risk of underachievement. Beyond being in receipt of FSM, the criteria a student for receiving this input included: sensory and behavioural needs that a student found difficult to regulate; heightened states of over-stimulation or anxiety; changes in a student’s needs or circumstances that were potentially impacting on their ability to make good progress at school. Yoga interventions were delivered by a Higher Level Teaching Assistant who has received training in special needs yoga and were supported by Teaching Assistants where it was needed. The pupil premium paid for staff to carry these interventions out.

£2000 was allocated towards purchasing a package of Speech and Language Therapy (SALT). We had identified the students were broadly in need of increased input from a specialist speech and language therapist and had purchased an additional service accordingly for the school. Using a portion of the Pupil Premium money, some of this SALT package was used specifically for students at risk of not making good progress at school.

TMTS used £7175 to purchase 69 days of additional Teaching Assistant support for eligible students who were at risk of underachieving or who may not have been making progress as fast as we thought they could have.

Alongside the above interventions, we allocated £10,615 towards the cost of teaching staff. This increased the capacity of our teaching team to design and implement a range of strategies to ensure students who might otherwise not have done, stayed on track to meet or exceed academic targets in 2014-15.

The impact of the pupil premium:

The impact resulting from the use of the pupil premium at TMTS was high. Whether students received an individual intervention or a combination, they were able to benefit by making good progress. This definition included academic progress but also other measures such as increased enjoyment of learning, increased understanding of their environment and improved social skills or self-regulation of behaviour.

Overall analysis of the progress made by students eligible for Pupil Premium funding showed they performed well as a group. Differences in progress and attainment at TMTS are most strongly explained by differences in types of SEN rather than socio-economic group membership. Pupil Premium funding enabled TMTS to implement interventions that helped a number of students to stay on track and meet their targets regardless of the disadvantages they may have faced resulting from their lower income background. The interventions fall outside the remit of our traditional funding and for this reason, the Pupil Premium has had a high impact.

2013-14 Pupil Premium Expenditure and Impact

TMTS received £31,125 for its students in KS3 and 4 eligible for Free School Meals. All of this was money was spent.

How the money was allocated:

A target-group of eligible students at risk of underachieving through behavioural needs were identified and given interventions through Yoga. This was carried out by a Teaching Assistant  whose training along with part of their salary was paid in order to deliver the yoga intervention on a weekly basis. Additionally, other students who were eligible for the Pupil Premium received Yoga intervention on a non-regular basis. In total, £11,425 of the TMTS Pupil Premium allocation was spent in this way.

Two part-time specialist teachers were employed to work closely with class staff where the class contained students eligible for the Pupil Premium. The specialisms of the two teachers were PMLD and ASD. Both teachers worked with staff to evaluate the effectiveness of current practice, monitor the implementation of interventions and provide training to raise standards. Follow up interventions for students were designed and delivered where necessary.  This also generated further capacity for disseminating good practice across the school. In total, £19,700 of the TMTS Pupil Premium allocation was spent in this way.

The Impact of the Pupil Premium:

The pupil premium had a high impact at TMTS in 2013-14. The seven students receiving intensive yoga interventions made good progress in self-regulating, reducing their anxiety and breathing patterns with increased independence and cooperative behaviours. This fed through into their progress across the curriculum. Each of these students made good or better progress in 2013-14. Where yoga was used beyond the seven original students (usually as a response to students exhibiting anxiety), students were able to self-regulate and refocus on their learning within a short period of time.

In overall analysis of student progress at TMTS for 2013-14, students eligible for Free School Meals (and in receipt of the Pupil Premium) performed well as a group, making good or better progress. Their attainment and rate of progress was comparable with students not eligible for the Pupil Premium. Differences in progress and attainment at TMTS are largely explained by differences in types of SEN. Effective evaluation and intervention across multiple classes by the additional specialist teachers have significantly contributed to raising standards and enabling all students to progress regardless of socio-economic background.